Executive women challenging the C-suite to embrace "yes and" thinking

Last week I emceed the Aventage Women in Leadership Summit in Brisbane. The line up of speakers was great - a veritable smorgasbord of who's who in Queensland business and government - CEOs, CFOs, Directors and COOs.

As always, there were a couple of standout performances including two women from the defence force whose stories were enough to make your toes curl - and almost want to make you sign up to be a pilot in the airforce! I hear they are recruiting.

And delegates weren't afraid to ask curly questions of the panelists and speakers.  (For those looking to increase your visibility in industry - asking questions from the floor is a great first step. Then getting on the panel circuit is the next step. Pop me a note to learn more...  )

piechart

Targets and quotas vs cultural change
One of the issues that came up time and time again was the topic of quotas. Should we implement quotas and targets to help us achieve gender balance?

Interestingly, most of the female speakers and panelists saw them as an important tool to redress the balance, implemented for a period of time. The biggest opponents of targets and quotas were the male business leaders - some of whom were Male Champions of Change. Nearly every single one said they'd rather use cultural change to effect change.

Fair enough. No-one would dispute the benefits of cultural change and to quote Peter Drucker:
 

Culture eats strategy for breakfast”

But even in the Peter Drucker world, the debate goes on to qualify that you don't want to disconnect the two. Cultural change can, and should, be linked intimately with strategy.

So here's a radical thought - why don't we implement cultural change PLUS quotas and targets?

  • Why does it have to be either/or?
  • Why can't it be yes/and?
  • Surely a combined approach would deliver better benefits far faster?

Dualistic thinking
Most of us tend to think dualistically:

  • Either/or,
  • Good or bad,
  • Black or white,
  • This method, or that method, or even ..,
  • This year we'll go on the cruise of our dreams or we go to the retreat in Bali.

This old school type of thinking comes from the rigour of scientific experiments where we eliminate one method before we test another in order to work out which is most effective.  It also driven by scarcity thinking where we think we should only have the luxury of one option at a time.

A more contemporary approach (thanks Ros) would be to implement a "yes and" approach, where we try a range of methods, all at once.

Obviously this would mean we might not be sure which part of the program worked:

  • Was it the targets or quotas?
  • Was it the cultural change program?
  • Was it something else entirely?

But who cares?  We now have mountains of evidence and research backing up the business case for diversity.  Organisations are leaving money on the table by going slow on diversity measures. Surely organisations and governments should be using a range of mechanisms to bring balance into workplaces - and not one or the other?  


"Yes and" thinking and your career

"Yes and" thinking can be applied in a range of situations. With the rise of popularity of people owning up to be multipotentialites "yes and" thinking is incredibly liberating. To quote Emilie Wapnik on TED, a multipotentialite is a person who has many different interests and creative pursuits in life. Multipotentialites have no “one true calling” the way specialists do.

Some of my clients get really excited about the possibilities that "yes and" thinking brings up for them as well as they head toward a world of the portfolio career.

I'm sure that there are organisations out there who have seen the light and are implementing multi pronged "yes/and" type approaches, and if yours is, I'd love to hear.

I'm even sure that most of us would benefit from laying a "yes and" lens across a range of areas of our lives, and finding options that make it more fulfilling as well.

Let's ditch professional silos and competition between business units and embrace a smorgasbord of inclusive thinking, collaborative problem solving and cross functional, holistic, change management instead. After all - individuals and organisations who do are going to be relevant far longer than those who don't.

Would love to hear your thoughts. Drop me an email and get in contact.


Vive la révolution!
#ambitionrevolution #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes #feminineambition #careerfutureproofing #visibility

 

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Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

Visibility, Age and Self Promotion

The last few weeks have seen us exploring the issue of being visible (or not) in the leadership talent pipeline.


However, we can’t talk about the issues of visibility in the leadership talent pipeline for women without addressing age - and for women, and the gender bias around aging couldn’t be more obvious.  

Young women are dismissed as "likeable" and "pretty" but lacking in credibility. (The most memorable line from my own career 20 years ago was "lets give the little woman something to keep her busy".  But that's a story for another day.)

While the older a woman becomes, the more “invisible” she becomes, with some arguing the mysterious magical tipping point of 50 years old - despite this being an ideal age to be leading.

The opposite is true for men who are perceived to become more credible and more influential with age. (Hmmmm, just like fine wine or an aged cheddar).
 
In addition to the bias that surrounds aging for women there is the issue of socialisation, where more mature women have not been socialised to self promote. In research released in 2014 revealed that senior women executives still struggle with some of the career advancement challenges that women in middle management do. The research was the result of a survey of 326 senior women leaders across North America and the challenges that arose were:

  • self-promotion,
  • advocating for themselves, and
  • expressing their expertise

Let's face it, we're far more likely to suggest that a junior colleague should nominate for an Award than we are to nominate ourselves. 

stand out

Women have been socialised to believe that doing the job well, rigorously and thoroughly is a fast track to success and that our results and good work should speak for themselves. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but we got the wrong memo.

Additionally, younger generations have grown up in the era of the rise of the celebrity and self promotion. While more mature generations may not be as comfortable with self promotion, younger generations are executing self promotion strategies, advocating on their own behalf and claiming expert status far more skillfully and effortlessly - whether we like it or not.

Standing out for the right reasons
As women with leadership aspirations, in addition to doing the "good work", we also need to stand out, become more visible and create impact.  

If you're beginning to feel less than worthy because of your age, don't worry. Recent research demonstrating that in fact women over the age of 55 are better suited to lead organisational change than many of their male counterparts. According to Jessica Leitch, people and organization consultant at PwC -

“Historically women over the age of 55 would not have been an area of focus (for HR managers), but as the research suggests, this pool of talent might hold the key to transformation and in some cases, business survival ... "

So how do we become more visible?
How do we create impact? How can we stand out? We need to learn -

  • to self promote,
  • be able to articulate our achievement’s back up into the business with key messages about value, and
  • we need to advocate on our own behalf, not just on behalf of our team or junior staff as is frequently our want.

And what else?  
Nuance is key - because when we hit up against stereotype and biases we run the risk of being criticised rather than elevated.  So ensure that your visibility strategy includes multiple and varied ways of articulating the same three elements - the problems you solve, the difference you make and the value you add to the business.

Vive la révolution! #ambitionrevolution #visibility #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes

 

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

Visibility, vulnerability & vitriol - when visibility makes you vulnerable

The flipside of lack of visibility is too much scrutiny. There is definitely a downside for those who do become more visible, in that it makes you vulnerable. The higher up the food chain you go, the more visible you become, in particular if you are unique or can identify as a minority in some way. In an ideal world that truly valued diversity, that difference would be seen as a unique value proposition. Obviously we're not quite there yet.
 
The more visible you are, the more vulnerable you become. And because we still have so few women in leadership, it is seen as unfeminine in some way at best and as taking jobs away from the blokes at worse, which opens us up to criticism. Unfortunately these criticisms are rarely about our leadership, what we say or even our results, but frequently about:        

FlamingoStandOut
  • Our appearance, hair and wardrobe choices
  • Our speech mannerisms
  • Whether or not we are nice enough
  • The way we manage our family obligations
  • How we articulate ambition
  • How we express our femininity  

And because female leaders are so few and far between, if a woman leader makes a mistake it’s as though she makes it on behalf of all women every where – which I'm sure is a deterrent for many and would definitely increase the sense of vulnerability.
 
In Australia we have a long history of personal attacks against senior female political figures. In recent years we saw the extremely personal nature of the attacks against former Prime Minister Julia Gillard by men and women alike – which prompted her world famous misogyny speech as a response.
 
Currently we are witnessing the on-going attacks of a personal nature against Human Rights Commissioner Gillian Triggs. Despite your political view point, the extremely personal nature and the vitriol directed at her is enough to put to put anyone off becoming more visible including younger ambitious women who may have been considering a life in public office.  

Additionally, unless you've been off the grid or hiding under a rock, it's been very difficult to ignore the overtly personal criticisms and attacks of Hilary Clinton during the USA presidential campaign. In fact, I'm still feeling somewhat traumatised by the seemingly sanctioned overt acts of aggression.
 
This is not limited to female politicians or office bearers, but anyone in the public eye. You may remember the producers of Q&A on ABC in February 2016 discussing some of the challenges they experienced in getting women to appear on the show which included the adversarial nature of the show, plus the social media bullying and trolling that was highly likely to eventuate as a result of being visible on the show.
 
While most of my clients don’t work in public office, several do work in the rarefied air of C-suite executive offices or in masculine working environments where women are still few and far between. They are extremely visible and therefore somewhat vulnerable, unless adequately prepared.

And there in lies the rub.  How do you adequately prepare?

My clients tell stories of being accused, by men and women, of being aggressive, unfeminine and worse, when they are trying to impose tighter safety measures, transformational change programs or tighten risk management frameworks. I hear stories of Boardroom bullying behaviours that make me cringe where once again, the person, not the policy is under attack.

However, I also hear stories of both men and women calling out these tactics for what they are.  These issues shouldn't be swept under the table and ignored. Bullying tactics and personal verbal attacks need to be identified, called out and stopped. Easier said than done, but perhaps right now is the time to do something about it.

Remember the rule of thumb - critique the plan, the play or the policy, not the person, and certainly not for anything unrelated to the issue at hand.


There is an upside to recent political events - and that's the increase in awareness by men and women everywhere who have been horrified to see female leaders bullied so intensely and very differently from male leaders. Men have been equally as horrified as women.

My hope is that there is a newer understanding of some of the challenges that women experience in their quest to lead.  I am also inspired to think that a newer breed of courageous female leaders, and male champions of change will endorse and champion leadership talent, no matter how it expresses itself.

Gender equality will be achieved when we have as many incompetent women in senior leadership roles as we do incompetent men.
— Jane Caro


Vive la révolution!
#ambitionrevolution #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes #feminineambition #careerfutureproofing #visibility

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PS: I help women future proof their future leadership goals and ambitions! Call or email if you want to get started on yours.

 

 

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

Three Networking Hacks that Help Future Proof your Career

Confession time! I hate networking events. As an ambivert (mixed extrovert/introvert) there are times when I imagine I'd rather have root canal surgery than go to a networking function! (And no I never ever exaggerate).Yet when I get there I'm usually absolutely fine and sometimes the life of the party.

While the experts are out as to whether or not networking helps women in the same ways at it helps men, I personally can attest to the value of it on my career with two amazing opportunities presented to me by way of introductions at functions:

  • A chance conversation at an industry conference dinner helped me transition interstate
  • I landed another Step Up type role in another organisation because of an introduction at an industry Awards lunch

Why did it help me? In one I was a relative unknown in industry and the conference introduced me to the right people at the right time. At the second opportunity it was a mix of right people, right time and right key messages. If I hadn't been there asking smart questions I would never have known about either opportunity or had an opportunity to put my best foot forward in a casual business environment. 

This last month in our Young Executive Mastermind Groups, we used the Visibility Strategy quadrant model and created a series of practical ideas to help attendees future proof their future career prospects. Remember, the top right hand quadrant of the model is where you want to be. You want STAR Status (obviously) and in order to do that you need to act strategically but also ensure you are visible with the following criteria - right audience, right key messages, right places and right time.

The problem with being a collaborative problem solver for women and career

When you are a collaborative problem solver, you run the risk of being head down, bottom up,  out of line of sight in the leadership talent pipeline. This is a far bigger problem for women than men because we've been socialised to believe that in order to get ahead we need to do great work and the work itself will speak to our success. Unfortunately this isn't true for most, so when we've got a personal brand as The FIXER it's as though we have the cloak of invisibility on.

Not only does the business not want to disturb us while we go about solving those enormous business problems (governance, compliance, transformational change or reputational risk) but while we're doing that, someone who is more ambitious and more visible will simply overtake and or bypass us.

It's therefore really important that you start strategically building out a plan that includes networking - with the right audience, in the right places, at the right time and ..... oh yes, BYO right key messages - even while you solve those big problems within the business.

Three tactics to Help you gain visibility while strategically tackling your networking

Yes, you do need to network. I know, you hate it, but networking does help. And with a plan, you can make this far more fun and even turn it into a bit of a challenge. So here are just three tips that you can do to shift from The FIXER Mode (strategic but low visibility) to The STAR (high visibility PLUS strategic) within a few months.

1. Strategically plan the events that you go to at the beginning of the year - and be sure to include mixed gender networking events

The most successful men and women I know plan their event schedule 12 months in advance. Really? Yes really. It's smart, it's less reactive, you're committed and it's easy.  Most of us would prefer being at the dentist than attending a networking event.  So by creating a plan of one strategic event per month, you are playing 'above the line'. Below the line = excuses, blame, resentment, avoidance and not accepting responsibility for your own part in the process . Above the line = accepting responsibility and creating your own career success and reality - Step Up, Speak Out and Take Charge.

  • Most peak bodies and industry groups get their calendars done in the latter part of the year. If you work for a larger corporate your own organisation will also have events where it is wise to be seen at. Review the events schedule and make a plan in advance and book them in well ahead of time.  Of course ad-hoc events will come up, and you will always have a choice.
  • If you do work for a large corporate it can be tempting to only network within your organisation. While loyalty is admired by some, the smarter play might be to also network externally. Once again, get out of your comfort zone and put external networking in your plan as well.
  • Remember the criteria of "right audience"? You need to be seen and heard by the decision makers and leaders of your industry and/or business.  Rule of thumb: Until such time as we have more than 19% women in senior leadership roles, mixed gender networking events are going to be better for career progression and being noticed by right people in positions of power. Here's a great article on Forbes about why women's events fail and a really interesting Harvard Business Review article on Assessing the Value of your Network. However, in the initial stages of your career women's only events can be great for confidence building and meeting like-minded professionals - so why not create a program that is a blend?

 

2. Prepare so you can ask a smart question from the back of the room during Q&A

Do your homework and prep it in advance. This is part of the Step Up, Speak Out, Take Charge process - you need be prepared to step up, to develop a voice that can be heard and is valued - so do prepare and rehearse ,as silly as that may sound.

One of the smartest women I know does this on a regular basis. She has a PhD, yet is naturally a little shy - but always sounds extremely confident when asking questions from the floor. I puzzled over this for months, then asked her the secret, and was surprised how easy it was. Preparation. She always prepares a question or two at home. The preparation not only helps her to sound confident and as though she knows what she is talking about (by the way, she really does), but it also gets her thinking analytically about the content of what might be in the presentation well in advance, which helps her with more ad-hoc responses as well.

3. Send a thank you note afterwards

This is god-dammed brilliant and I learned from the best of the best when I was going to a lot of USA conferences and having US delegates returning the visit in Australia. In the USA when you meet someone at a business networking event you nearly always get an email follow up to thank you the next day.

WOW! The first time it happened I was blown away because this is extremely uncommon in Australia. But it really made such a difference to my perception of the people I met, thatI've definitely gone out of my way to create time for people who followed up on networking post the event.

In fact, this is so uncommon in Australia that I recommend ensuring that you keep a light touch - so you don't come across too creepy. Say thanks, acknowledge something about the other person and suggest that if they need anything they can drop you a line. Then a few weeks later follow up with a phone or coffee meeting request.  Avoid too intense, the too soon sales pitch or coming across as needy. Instead focus on how you can help them, mutual interests in the future and keeping conversations open down the track.

Go forth and network with confidence and strategy

So there you go - three great tips for attending networking seminars and events that will ensure you stay visible and strategic. It's definitely all in the preparation. You don't want to be known as The PLAYER -  that person who turns up to the opening of an envelope, but no-one knows what you stand for. Or you run the risk of beingbypassed if you stay as The FIXER. 

You do however, want to be known as a serious contender for future opportunities. These three tactics ensure you are visible, your thought leadership is beginning to show, your interest in career development and advancement is far more obvious, and your willingness to do something about it yourself, is crystal clear.

Step up, speak out and take charge!  It's that easy.

Vive la révolution! #ambitionrevolution #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes #feminineambition #careerfutureproofing #visibility

If you have any ideas I'd love to hear!  Comment below or pop me an email!

And if you liked this, please share. Let's create a networking of ambition revolutionaries the globe over.

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

Stereotypes, advertising and being prepared to stand out

I like to describe myself as a proudly visible member of the most invisible segments of our society - older women.
— Cindy Gallop

As I begin to unpack the issue of visibility for women in leadership, I can't help but reflect on the advertising industry. Cindy Gallop, the British self described 'visible older woman' advertising industry executive quoted above, is an extremely vocal advocate of change. Change, not just about the women and men who work in the sector, but because of the key messages this powerful industry perpetuates in society. In a nutshell, the advertising industry sells and perpetuates stereotypes - what it is to be a bloke, a woman, to be young, old, successful - and these stereotypes become then norm.

Relevantly, a recent global study of the advertising industry found that -

"just 2% of adverts featured women who could be described as “intelligent”; just 3% were shown in leadership roles."

The advertising industry is just the tip of the iceberg with the media and entertainment industries, all such powerful influencers of our socialisation, compounding the problem and promoting and reinforcing a lack of 'visibility' for women as leaders.

 
diversity

Real life statistics
Real life statistics aren't much better off with the recent McKinsey and Lean In global research highlighting that women only make up 19% of those in the C-suite despite intense focus and huge effort in the last 50 years.

The survey also found that the roadblocks, brick walls and glass ceilings that more mature women have battled for years are still having impact on younger generations - with 23% of millennial women believe their gender has prevented them from getting ahead at work (compared to 26% non-millennials), and with a more than 14% ambition gap between millennial women vs men (compared to 17% non-millennial).

You cannot be who you cannot see.
— Cindy Gallop

It's not that women aren't getting there because we're/they're not good enough. In fact, there is now overwhelming evidence to the contrary including analysis of performance during the GFC demonstrating that organisations with mixed gender Boards performed better at that time.  It's just that perception and biases get in the way of us seeing (women included) that women also make great leaders.

Bias is bad for business
Bias is a huge issue for those who aspire to leadership roles but don't fit the stereotype. It's also a huge issue for those industries and organisations who have yet to embrace the benefits that diversity brings in order to meet 2020 business challenges and remain competitive.

Relevance and sustainability in a modern and ever changing business environment are some of the greatest obstacles in any industry. If organisations want to remain relevant and be around in the future, they need to ensure that women are seen as leadership potential. Put simply, invisibility and the biases that surround it, are a problem for both the individual and the organisation. And to quote Jonathan Segal;

"Bias is bad for business."

When ambitious women don't fit in easily (don't always get the jokes, don't look the same, don't play golf, don't know the unwritten ground rules, other women think we're bossy and men may feel threatened) we may accidentally find ourselves becoming invisible in the leadership talent pipeline despite targets, quotas and best intentions.

Taking a stand makes companies stand out
Recently we've seen several brands come out and really embrace the benefits that diversity brings. Earlier in the year we saw Lynx parent company Unilever come out publicly and vow to drop advertising that promotes stereotypes.  Yes, this makes them far more visible in a crowded market place. Plus the lamb diversity campaign by the MLA in Australia is a great example of turning diversity into a competitive advantage.  

In a modern world, future focused successful organisations are also embracing diversity as a competitive advantage in terms of attracting talent, creating new markets and mechanisms to innovate.  

Why not be a stand out individual?

For the individual, this represents an opportunity to really stand out as well. This is an opportunity for you as an individual to let go of the old ways of getting ahead - fitting in, playing the game and playing by the rules. They aren't going to work much longer anyway.

Instead embrace the new rules of the portfolio career, personal branding and self promotion. Leadership opportunities will go to those who are prepared to Step Up, Speak Out and Take Charge. And the best bit? This then becomes a competitive advantage for those who don't fit the mold.

Some rules of thumb to remember in your quest for leadership:

  • Back yourself and be prepared to have a crack at it - women have a tendency to underestimate our future performance as compared to men. Don't let that tendency stand in your way.
  • You shouldn't have to fit in in order to lead - in fact it might be more helpful if you stand out
  • Invisible might feel comfortable, but visibility is the new black
  • Results don't speak for themselves, you need to speak to them
  • Your future leadership personal brand is your key differentiator
  • It's your job to sell brand you, not someone else's

While the advertising industry itself still has a long way to go, there are great lessons emerging for us all. And as Oscar Wild once wrote;

"Life imitates art far more than art imitates life."
 

Your thoughts?

  • Does your organisation promote the same old tired stereotype? Or are you seeing fresh ideas and different thinking championed and celebrated throughout the business? 
  • If you are seeing fresh ideas and different thinking championed - what are the results to date?
  • What mechanisms does your organisation have in place in order to encourage different thinking, diverse ideas and innovation?  
  • Have you tried to stand out and did it work (yet)?
Why not BYO chair? The view from the top is great.

Why not BYO chair? The view from the top is great.

Let me know.  I love receiving emails from you with your own ideas and insights.
And by the way - still don't have a seat at the table?  Why don't you BYO chair?  The view is great from where I'm sitting!

Vive la révolution!

#ambitionrevolution #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes #feminineambition

 

And if you liked this article - please share.

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

Where are you getting in your own way?

Ground Hog day

I have a confession to make: Remember Bill Murray in Groundhog day? Where he keeps on having to relive the same moment in time, over and over again, until he learns the lesson?  Well I've recently had to acknowledge my groundhog day moment. And it's this: if I simply get out of my own way I achieve far greater results for both myself AND my clients. 

I'm exactly like Bill Murray and I keep having to learn this lesson, over and over again. 

So what does "getting out of your own way" mean? 

Here are some examples that might resonate for you:

  • You're too busy just now to finalise that Award nomination - despite this being exactly what needs to be done
  • You couldn't possibly finish publishing that VLOG because your hair isn't sitting perfectly today - despite the output being a key milestone on your business plan
  • You simply can't get up in the morning and exercise, despite your doctor telling you you need to do more exercise
  • You never make it to your evening yoga class (because you simply don't do mornings) because you're tired and have to work late
  • You're too busy and too indispensable to schedule annual leave - and yet somehow others around you get to go on that European cycling holiday or Balinese yoga retreat without any seeming penalty
  • You work late nights and on weekends week on week, despite noticing that it's impacting on your creativity, health and friendships - and despite you knowing better (oh yes that's me!)
  • You don't set up regular schedules for business development activities, despite knowing that your success depends on it, because you feel a bit uncomfortable. 
  • You approach an expert to help you set up your business but then don't follow the process because, of course, you know better.

It's procrastination pure and simple

Getting in your own way, tripping yourself up or slowing yourself down is a form of procrastination.  You're delaying on doing things that are about your success or that you know are good for you because you think you know better or that things might work out in the wash. The reality check is that if you were to ask someone's advice it would be a no-brainer, yet we still don't act.

So how can you get out of your own way?

Try these three questions. Ask yourself:

  1. What would your future leadership self do in this situation?
  2. What's the worst thing that could happen if you do?
  3. What's the worst thing that could happen if you don't?

All of a sudden your way forward is a whole heap easier - you have clarity, purpose and strategy all rolled into one.

Vive la révolution!  #ambitionrevolution #feminineambition #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes

My mission in life is to help women to play a much bigger game – change the world if you will – and do so with big ideas, big vision and big, audacious bucket loads of confidence.

 

 

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

What would your future leadership personal brand do?

In Australia there is an extremely witty television series on the ABC called Gruen which lifts the lid on the world of advertising, spin and marketing. As an aside, and as a glowing testament to the IQ of the viewing public, the show's ratings beat both The Block and The Bachelor in 2016.

What would your future self do?

What would your future self do?

Each week they have a segment that features a particularly dominant world personality. This season that was Justin Trudeau, the Prime Minister of Canada - a self confessed feminist and driver of change.  With tongue firmly planted in cheek the host, Will Anderson, poses the question "What would Justin do?" with a graphic of a superhero ripping open his/her shirt to expose a superhero chest and then flick to a clip of Mr Trudeau doing something pretty amazing or unusual somewhere in the world.

But what about your personal brand?

So now it's your turn. When was the last time you clearly defined your future leadership personal brand?  Never? Well why not try now? Go on. Grab your 'confidence journal' and start describing.

  • What work would your future leadership self be doing?
  • What would you stand for?
  • What do you believe in?
  • What difference would you be making?
  • How would you behave or react?
  • What language and voice would you be using?
  • What would you be wearing?
  • How would you turn up to work every day?
  • What would be your leadership style?
  • What difference would you be making?
  • How much money would you be making?
  • Who would you be hanging out with?
  • How would you respond to criticism?
  • How would you respond to compliments?
  • What things would you share on Social?
  • What conversations are you having (and with whom)?
  • What decisions would you be making? and
  • Who, or what ,are you leading?

Your answers to these questions (and more) become your blueprint, or even a road map, to help you navigate more successfuly as you head into leadership territory. Your answers will also help others work out how to interact with you and what to expect from you plus keep you one step ahead of your competition. After all people are inspired by leaders who look like they know where they are going. 

Pro-active personal brand development is not as common as it should be

According to Glenn Llopis on Forbes

"less than 15% of leaders have defined their personal brand and only 5% are living it every day."

Yet with success and and a clearly defined personal brand so closely correlated I wonder why this is?

By doing this work pre-emptively are already well ahead of the pack. This becomes your competitive advantage - and makes tough decisions far easier.

Definitions belong to the definers, not the defined.
— Toni Morrison

 

Use your leadership self to help Solve problems

So in the same Gruen vein, I suggest that any time you come up with a dilemma that you can't solve via the usual channels, you rip open your metaphorical superhero leadership shirt and ask yourself, what would your future leadership brand do? And solve it that way.

Decisions are far easier when you bring your biggest, best and most leaderly self to work every day.

We like to think of our champions and idols as superheroes who were born different from us. We don’t like to think of them as relatively ordinary people who made themselves extraordinary.
— Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
 

Don't listen to the itty bitty shitty committee

When it comes to a situation at work that you don't prefer, or a dilemma you can't solve easily then you want to approach it with your leadership personal brand front and centre. Don't listen to the itty bitty shitty committee, or the scared weird little guys who frequently sit on your shoulder and give you small and safe advice.  Simply approach the situation with your future leadership personal brand blueprint, along with the those three feminine super powers (active listening, clear communication and emotional intelligence) and work your way through. You'll thank yourself later.

Plus by doing the work and unpacking your future personal brand pre-emptively you're already one step ahead of the curve so when a difficult situation occurs in the future, you'll feel far more clear, confident and certain far sooner.

Vive la révolution! #ambitionrevolution #feminineambition #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes

My mission is to help women to play a much bigger game – change the world if you will – and do so with big ideas, big vision and big, audacious bucket loads of confidence.

 

If you enjoyed this please spread the word! Let's inspire women everywhere to keep their eye on the prize

 

AmandaBlesing
  • I am the creator of The Ambition Revolution – the science and art of amping smart and savvy
  • I mentor busy professional women to ensure they remain smart, strategic and focused on the bigger game.
  • I also work with organisations who are trying to increase the profile of women in leadership, but are struggling to do so.

 

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

Why executive women need to create a visibility strategy

Gone are the days when you turned up to work and put in the time, and in return got

  • a pat on the back,
  • a promotion, and
  • a payrise ... then waited a while longer while you marched towards the sweet release of retirement.

It simply doesn't work that way anymore - but neither do I think we really want it to. We all love stories such as the 90+ year old nurse still working and flourishing. I used to work with a 92 yo consultant who came into the office every day and advised on policy and protocol - an area where he had considerably more experience and expertise than the rest of the team put together.

Visibiility

However with the rise of the portfolio career, and where brand development is both for companies and for people, plus an era of self promotion you need to develop a few more powerful tactics.

Visibility

Visibility is a cool tool.  Staying ahead of the visibility curve is great for both you and for your business.  And here's the kicker - even if you don't do it particularly well, it's still better than not doing it at all.

Well executed visibility - rising to the top

Averagely executed visibility - staying afloat

No visibility - sinking

Strategy

I'm taking this one step further and saying we need to be strategic about this.  It's not enough to simply spread yourself thin at networking functions and golf games any more. You need to focus on what's most effective - separate busy from strategic and focus on the areas that are going to give you the most bang for you buck and deliver on the results you need. 

And in this day and age whether you are a business owner, a professional in a firm, or maybe on a fast track to corporate C-suite ascendancy - any strategy, even the wrong strategy, is better than no strategy.

Four rules of thumb to remember:

  • Work is not school - you won't get the corner office by being good or quiet
  • No-one promotes the stressed out, worn out and flustered looking executive with their head down up the back of the office
  • Results no longer speak for themselves
  • Stop being busy, start being strategic

Visibility and Strategy Unpacked

When you cross reference busy v's strategic and low visibility v's high visibility - you begin to see the picture.

Busy & low visibility (going nowhere) - head down, tail up, doing the job because it's the right thing to do. Historically this may have worked, but not any more. You will be bypassed and overlooked despite working hard and best intentions on your part.

High visibility but busy (going crazy) - leaves you worn out, overworked and potentially resentful as you feel like you've been hung out to dry for things that weren't even in your remit. When you're worn out and overworked, you are far more likely to lean out, pick up your bat and ball and go play elsewhere. And remember how after just two years in a business women lose their ambition more than men and are more likely to lean out? I wonder if this contributes.

Low visibility but strategic (going somewhere slowly) - you're being strategic about the approaches you make, very considered and highly professional. Quite possibly you're feeling a little frustrated as you see other younger players head on past you far more easily or you're simply bypassed by those who do know how to sell themselves.  Maybe you've turned down opportunities to tackle different projects, to speak, to write whitepapers or be quoted in the press until you feel better prepared or more certain. You tell yourself that it's better to have have more substance than flash, but can't help but wondering if you are doing something wrong. Sound familiar? 

High visibility AND strategic (the sweet spot) - where visibility meets strategy and sees you leading a team, tackling big substantive work or creating enterprise/industry wide change far sooner than you might possibly imagine. You'll have fine tuned a nuanced approach to talking up the problems you solve, the difference you in particular make and the value you are adding.

What needs to be in your visibility strategy?

Here are 13 ideas to get you started. The list consists of basically anything that aligns with your goals, dreams or ambitions that is going to see you shine or draw attention to you and your contribution. For women, we walk a perilous knife edge between flying our own flag and flagrant self promotion - so keep the need for nuance in mind as you go.  Nuance, not to be confused with retiring. Nuance - subtle, effective and (in this case) really smart 'n savvy.

1. Define what you want - work out what it is you want to be when you grow up. Don't panic!  In a world where careers are morphing and changing in more cyclical and circular ways, vertical career strategy is a thing of the past, so maybe work out what's next for right now and start there.

2. Accept responsibility - let go of notions of my work should speak for itself or others should be able to see the good work I do because it simply doesn't happen any more. Stakeholders in your career success are busy themselves. As Avril Henry said at the Women World Changers event in Sydney in October -

"The only person who is as interested in your career as you - is you! So do something about it."

3. Always be linking back to the strategy - your own, or your organisation's. Anything and everything you do should connect back to a why that underpins the reason you are at work. If you don't know what the strategic objectives are for your department or your organisation, or you haven't worked them out for your own personal brand, then go do that now. Turning up to simply pass the time and get a paycheck is not for those who have leadership goals or ambitions.

4. Put your hand up before you feel ready - don't wait to be asked or until you feel prepared to do anything on this list. Ever had the experience of trying something new only for it to become your new normal? Give it a crack and you might find

5. Don't hide your light under a bushel - let go of shy and demure, it doesn't serve anyone. If Susan Cain's Quiet taught us anything it was that introverts can indeed lead - and indeed, lead better than many in times of trouble such as the GFC.  So stand up straight, walk with purpose and confidence, develop a voice that can be heard in meetings, dress in colours that draw attention (well ...... maybe not purple but who am I to judge!), stop apologising and own your own stuff.

6. Develop your leadership personal brand on social media - once again help people to help you - if people can work out who you are and what you stand for by what you like, share, comment or write about on social it makes it far easier to help you.

7. Regularly report on what you do - make sure that you get a regular spot in your department/division meeting to report on the progress of the project or BHAG. Don't hide it. Don't wait to be asked. Volunteer.

8. Write up a case study - the beauty of volunteering for special projects is that it gives you material to reflect on and possibly teach others. Write up a case study and share in your team meeting, AND with your manager, AND on the intranet, AND on LinkedIn (with your disclaimer about views expressed etc), AND on Twitter, PLUS with other departments who are keen to motivate younger team members or who might be tackling the same issue themselves - or share even with your peak body. Find ways to spread the word.

9. Be proactive with your peak body or professional association. Again - don't wait to be asked. Volunteer to help. Many associations run on the smell of an oily rag and are keen to have proactive contributors or volunteers on special projects to help them maintain their momentum. In my time as CEO of SOCAP our volunteer committees rewrote the industry Standard for Australia and New Zealand and created an industry wide Core Competency Framework that became the go to reference point for anyone in industry. Several of the committee members then went onto consult on the International Standard. Make sure you get credited for the work in some way whether that's a listing on the website, in the magazine, the report, or even a more active role at the industry conference. And then share the results of your work back into your business.

10. Learn to pitch or speak in public - yes I know that most people that many people rate public speaking as their #1 fear (above dying in fact). But as part of a modern and successful career you need to learn to speak and also pitch ideas well. The flip side of leadership is followership - and if you can pitch or speak, creating a followership is far easier.  If you can't speak already, then sign up for public speaking training or send yourself to Toastmasters, but do get started. Make it a priority.

11. Be seen with the movers and shakers - make time to mix, mingle and network with senior level decision makers inside and outside of your business. You need to go to where they are if they don't normally come to you. Find ways to make sure you are included in discussions both formal and informal that happen about the future of industry or your business. Don't be shy. Volunteer an opinion whether you think you know the right answer or not. You need to be heard in addition to being visible.

12. Consistency trumps frequency - Establish a maintenance schedule for your leadership personal brand - it's not enough to speak on a panel once and then tick it off your list as having been there done that. It's not enough to write an article once and think that one article will do the job. You need to be flying your own flag over and over again. Repeatedly. It takes time. Your visibility strategy needs to be ritualised and feature as a regular appointment in your calendar. But beware, you don't want to become the the squeaky wheel whereby you saturate the airwaves with brand you. Once again, be strategic. Find the Goldilocks sweet spot - that balance between too little and too much - and stick with it until you get a chance to reassess.

13. Reassess every 6 months - start at the top and work your way down to make sure that your plan doesn't need tweaking and refining.

So there you have it. 13 tactics to try to help you build a Visibility Strategy. If this looks like too much simply start at the beginning and work your way through over the period of a year.  Or you could sign up for Executive Coaching where brand you is dealt with front and centre. 

Vive la révolution! #ambitionrevolution #feminineambition #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes

Comments? I'm sure there are other things that you might be doing that may help others, so email me (or comment below) and let me know your thoughts.

 

 

If you enjoyed this please spread the word! Let's inspire women everywhere to keep their eye on the prize

 

  • I am the creator of The Ambition Revolution – the science and art of amping smart and savvy
  • I mentor busy professional women to ensure they remain smart, strategic and focused on the bigger game.
  • I also work with organisations who are trying to increase the profile of women in leadership, but are struggling to do so.
Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

Key learnings from the Women World Changer event in Sydney 12 Oct 2016

I'm a self confessed conference junkie. I've attended hundreds of them, and run more than most people have had hot dinners.   I enjoy the networking, I enjoy the opportunity to down tools and reflect on best practice, brash new ideas and challenging concepts. I also appreciate being in a room with like minded individuals and reflecting that;

"Gee, what I'm doing on the money.  Keep on going. This stuff makes a difference."

Last week I attended the Women World Changers one day event in Sydney.

The speaker lineup was a who's who in gender and broader diversity discussions from Australia and beyond including the following: Wendy McCarthy AO, Holly Ransom, Avril Henry, Ming Long, Mai Chen, Pat Milligan, Dr Simon Longstaff AO FCPA, Ainslie van Onselen, Giam Swiegers, Libby Lyons, Jenny Leong, Christine Bartlett, Veena Sahajwalla, Amy Mullins, John Lydon, Hala Gorani, Jennifer Dalitz, Melissa Browne, Kim-Louise Liddell, Gen George, Karen Beattie.

And "girl" did I have a great day!  It felt pretty fabulous to be in a room full of men and women committed to gender equity - and the benefits for business and society more broadly.  Thanks to both Carla Wall and Deborah Harrigan who joined me at the event. It was great to share and compare highlights afterwards.

Significant moments for me?

Wendy McCarthy AO as the opening keynote drawing attention to:

  • "the gap between well intentioned programs and programs that deliver real outcomes"
  • "the face of poverty in the future is an older woman with no super"

Patricia Milligan - on the data

  • "Companies who measure the progress and publish the results get better results"
  • "One of the biggest issues cited by women for leaving the workforce is health and well being issues"

Ming Long on encouraging men into the conversation

  • "Slavery didn’t end because black people thought it was a good idea. It disappeared because white people thought it was a good idea. Let’s get men into the discussion about gender equity"
  • "For the men in the room understand gender equity in the workplace is a smart business move, not just a nice to have because you have daughters"
  • "Some of the male champions don’t quite get it, but they’re on the journey and most importantly in positions of power to do something about gender equality"

Mae Chen on Super Diversity

  • "Cultural capability (CQ) is the new currency of success for business and individuals"
  • "I came to this conference because the title is Women World Changers - we need to change the world for humans, not just women"

Holly Ransom on the future of work

  • "The nature of work is changing and becoming portfolio in nature with consulting, freelancing and flexibility options seen as more and more attractive"
  • "6 degrees of separation is out the window - with impact of a social media it's estimated to be more like 3.8 degrees"

Avril Henry with a rousing close on how women can make a bigger difference for themselves

  • "No-one is more interested in your career than you. Put up your hand and manage it!"
  • "Winning women don't play nice, they play fair"

Please enjoy (and share) the Twitter highlights below!

Vive la révolution! #ambitionrevolution #feminineambition #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes

If you enjoyed this please spread the word! Let's inspire women everywhere to keep their eye on the prize

  • I am the creator of The Ambition Revolution – the science and art of amping smart and savvy
  • I mentor busy professional women to ensure they remain smart, strategic and focused on the bigger game.
  • I also work with organisations who are trying to increase the profile of women in leadership, but are struggling to do so.

 

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

What's your Force Multiplier?

Last week I wrote about Tipping/Tripping Points - that imaginary line in the sand where you go from "everything is wonderful" to "OMG, what's wrong with me!?" in one fell swoop.  

This week I've reflected on force multipliers - and if you don't have one, you need to go find one ... immediately.

A force multiplier is a military term for tools that help you amplify your efforts to produce more output. Basically, you get more done with the same amount of effort, or more bang for your buck.

In terms of my own force multiplier - it's yoga. When I manage to make time to practice yoga regularly the benefits are astounding ....

Yogalaptop
  1. I feel happier
  2. I'm far more creative
  3. My memory is better which gives the impression of being smarter and more in control
  4. I've got more energy and
  5. I'm pretty confident I'm a nicer person to be around (upbeat, less reactive, on an even keel)

Since getting back into a regular yoga practice it's as though I've taken my car in for a service. Everything is running far more efficiently. The benefits are manifold - both personally and professionally.

Okay, so I have a love affair with my yoga practice. But there is probably something in your life that does the same for you. Maybe it's cooking, spending time with your friends/kids, getting out in the garden, clocking up pavement time by walking/running/cycling, tinkering under the bonnet of your car or even writing. When you spend time doing this thing time drops away, you feel an increased sense of well being and back in control. Plus it gives you renewed energy to tackle big, hairy, ambitious projects again.

Health and well-being as one of the biggest issues cited by women for leaving the workforce
— according to Pat Milligan, Mercer's Global Leader of When Women Thrive at the Women World Changers Conference Sydney October 2016

 

So my question to you is:

"Why is it that when the proverbial hits the fan, our force multipliers are some of the first things to drop away?"

When we get busy we are far more likely to drop the very things that would help us cope (or even power through) more easily.  

As you know I'm a big believer in systems and routines the keep you successful. After all, you wouldn't keep Tim Tams in the cupboard if you were going on a diet.  

  • So what can you put in place that will help systematise your force multiplier?
  • What can you do to 'routinise' the things that keep you successful?
  • How can you make sure that you are prioritising the very things that are really important over the things that others expect of you, or your perfectionist self expects of yourself?

And do let me know, because your ideas maybe of huge benefit to someone else in this network.

There is an old Zen saying -

“You should sit in meditation for 20 minutes every day — unless you’re too busy; then you should sit for an hour.”

While meditation and yoga might not be your thing, the same principle applies. Don't stop doing the very things that keep you performing at your best at the very time you need them most.

Vive la révolution! #ambitionrevolution #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes #feminineambition

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

More Powerful Advice for Women Leading

Every few months I call out to my #feminineambition network for wisdom and advice for women and leadership. In case you missed it, here's the last one.

This month we learn from eight leading women in both Australia and overseas who are already doing it - tackling big juicy leadership problems with feminine leadership principles front of mind. Strategy, unpacking big business goals, managing staff, stakeholder relations and personal reflection are all under the microscope. Take what you need! And thanks so much to those who contributed.

 "Make sure everything you do plays to your vision (leaders should of course have articulated a vision for themselves). Another tip is to value and unpack those events or conversations that leave you feeling uncomfortable - they are your greatest learning opportunities as you hone your leadership skills." - Jocelyn Furlan, Principal, Furlan Consulting
“One of my biggest learnings in gaining respect in a boardroom dominated by men is to pick the right time to speak, make it powerful, focus on the big picture basing the comments on facts not emotions” -  Fiona Evans, Vice President, Customer Service, DHL
"When I think about how to tackle a business issue, or strive for growth through aspirational goals, I always start with the end in mind. Take the goal, target or outcome - then understand if we did nothing new what would the BAU performance be. This then identifies the true 'gap', target or goal! From there build an operational plan that addresses the 'gap'. Key success metrics, creation of executive and team member dashboards to allow regular communication of progress, provides run-way correction and initiatives as need to achieve your outcomes!"   - Deborah Harrigan, COO, Sales, Innovation, Technology and CX Consultant
“Take care of your team and your team will take care of you. Be interested in what they do outside of work and truly listen to them. You’ll be amazed at how much they’ll appreciate you for it. One of the biggest things I’ve seen time and time again is the amazing depth of knowledge that front line staff have of your business. Do the walk! Go out and meet the workforce. Ask them what their pain points are and how they think a process can be improved. You’ll be shocked at how much you’ll learn. Lastly, encourage failure. I know this sounds counter intuitive but from failure we learn. I like to meet with my team every week and ask them what they failed doing followed by what they learned from it. Being ok with failing in the workplace frees up anxiety and is quite liberating.” - Jo Zimpel PhD BI, Analytics and Strategy, Founder & Head Data Geek, DataNotes
"Always remember the value you bring to a relationship whether it is in a colleague, direct report, family or friend relationship. Once you appreciate this value, use it to reinforce your confidence and self-belief and encourage others to do the same."  - Jane Pires, Executive Manager - Group Customer Relations, Suncorp
"Change is a constant and inevitable. Your ability to manage change is a necessity." - Carla Wall, Managing Director, COINS Australia
"My approach is simple and well-tested: Build great relationships and establish clear goals. The positive relationships can be leveraged to collaborate and achieve your mission. As a leader, it's key to identify strong players, communicate well and keep those players engaged until you cross the finish line." - Shelley Elkins, Director, Customer Contact at CREDO Mobile
"Learn that the most challenging role in leadership can be working with the people not the projects.  Lead by example always and treat your people with respect - treat them how you like to be treated. Take time to get to know them but always remember that you are the final decision maker and need to be accountable and responsible for outcome. Everyone can teach you something new - give them the time to contribute their ideas." - Janita Friend, Managing Director and Owner, Best Friend PR and Marketing

Thanks for sharing everyone!

My mission in life is to help women to play a much bigger game – change the world if you will – and do so with big ideas, big vision and big, audacious bucket loads of confidence.

Vive la révolution!

#ambitionrevolution #feminineambition #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes


If you enjoyed this article why not share? Let's spread the word to help smart 'n savvy women and men everywhere.
 

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months

What's your Productivity Tipping Point?

Or maybe the headline should read "What's Your Productivity Tripping Point?"

Ever wondered why it’s so easy for you to go from "everything's perfect" and "on top of the world" one day, to “woe is me”, “everything is dreadful”, and “I’m not good enough” the next?  
 
I hear you!  It happens to me as well.  My ambitious woman avatar is a tad gungho. She is driven,  motivated and she throws herself into the fray full on - forgetting that she is in it for the long haul and that if she pushes too hard one day she pays the price the next.
 
Tim Ferriss of Four Hour Work Week and Four Hour Body fame refers to finding your the Minimum Effective Dose (MED).  That’s the minimum amount you need to do to get a great result.
 
Well I reckon most of us want to do more than the MED. When you’re on a mission you’re more likely to want to throw yourself in boots and all and give it your best shot.  But that best shot runs the risk of being far closer to your Tipping Point than your MED when you're in the realm of feeling like you need to prove yourself.

Instead, find your Tipping Point and step back from it one step, so you can play your long game. This links right back to the Goldilocks principle: not too much, not too little, but just right.
 
Just because some is good, doesn't mean more is better
So what triggers you tripping over your Tipping Point?  Frequently, not what you might imagine and all stuff you can take responsibility for easily.

Leadershiplonggame
  1. Sleep – is big.  As the book title says “Sleep your Way to the Top”.  Too little and you’re crabby. Too much and you totally lose your motivation and want to do not much all day.  I measure my sleep.  How cool is that? Try it. You might be surprised at what you find out.   
  2. Water - Dehydration = lethargic and impaired mental agility.  Too much has other consequences. Do your research and work out how much fluid is enough for you.
  3. Caffeine – has a half life of about 5-6 hours.  Drink too much in the afternoon and it not only impairs the quality of your sleep, but also makes you jumpy and increases your stress response all while you are unaware.
  4. Exercise – too much and too intense and you tip over into the realm of impaired performance at the gym AND at work - sluggish, drained and tired. And we all know what too little exercise does for you.  Enough said.
  5. Alcohol – and your tipping point might be closer than you really want to know about. Here’s a great article on New Scientist on the benefits of alcohol free for a while.
  6. Work - even if you’re managing all of the above and then work too much, you risk losing your edge.  Your performance diminishes and you potentially lose drive, motivation and ambition.  My tipping point is about 9 hours/day with time off on weekends.  I love my job. I love the people I work with, I love the difference I get to be part of in people’s lives and I love stretching and pushing myself. As a result I can focus intensely for hours on end but …… as soon as I go over 9 hours it tips me over the edge.  As a result, the next day I am once again, sluggish, defensive and unproductive.
  7. Uncertainty - the amplifying factor - if you've got lots of uncertainty going on with home, family or finances, or maybe there's been a leadership/management spill at work, then putting systems and routines in place to keep you just below your tipping point are critical.

Monitor your own productivity and performance

If you were a high performance athlete you’d be training daily with a coach who would provide that third person perspective and help you monitor your productivity and performance. But you’re not, so productivity and performance peaks and troughs will slip through the cracks un-monitored unless you take responsibility. 

Get yourself some wearable tech. Measure, reflect, journal and if you're really into it, keep a spreadsheet. Work out what works for you and what doesn't.  

  • When are you most effective at the office?
  • When are your staff performing best?
  • When do you and your team deliver best results?
  • When do you shine in front of an audience?
  • When are you and your boss performing like a well oiled machine?

And it might be as simple as tweaking one or two of the list above. So take responsibility and do something about it.
 
So what about you? What tips you over the edge?

  • Did setting yourself a challenge of 10 sales meetings per week actually help? Or did it get in the way of servicing existing clients well, with fewer, higher quality, more successful sales meetings?
  • Is that week of long hours really necessary? Or is it in fact keeping you tired and in the realm of never good enough, never enough hours in the day and feeling under confident.
  • Is that extra session at the gym really helpful? Or did it make you 'slangry' at work, rest and play?
  • Does that huge year of nose to the grindstone result, not in a promotion or a pay-rise, but in you wanting to lean out, pick up your bat and ball and go home, or find something else entirely?

Leadership is a long game
Remember, leadership is a long game. Work out your Tipping Point and you are on the way to successfully carving out a career that really counts far more easily.  And if you're feeling down, start creating strategies that help you shift you from wanting to hang up your aspiring leadership boots, to being back in the zone again - today.

 

My goal is that you win the feminine ambition trifecta - earn a great salary, feel like you are being heard and to know you are making an even bigger difference. 

Vive la révolution!
#ambitionrevolution #LookOutCSuiteHereSheComes #feminineambition

 

 

My mission in life is to help women to play a much bigger game – change the world if you will – and do so with big ideas, big vision and big, audacious bucket loads of confidence.


If you enjoyed this please spread the word. And don't forget - I love receiving emails from you with your own wins and achievements.

Feel like your leadership journey has stalled? Email ablesing@amandablesing.com to set up a 30 min one on one to learn more. Helping clients shift from feeling invisible to becoming invincible in just 12 months