women and career

3 Steps to Get The Top #Job You Really Want 💪🏼💗 - interview with Warwick Merry CSP

Warwick Merry and I caught to interview each other around our areas of expertise. 

He asked me about some of the issues that women face.

So many women know they are ready for the next job up the ladder but they struggle to land that next big role.   He asked me "how can a woman/person get that top job they really want?" 

Here are my three top tips

Research tells us that executive women struggle with self advocacy and self promotion - it's a potential minefield when you get it wrong, yet hard to navigate easily for women with a socialised archetype for helping others.

So my three tip tips? 
Learn to -
1) Back Yourself
2) Sell Yourself
3) Express Your Value in a way your target understands

Check out the video for a bit more detail and drop me a mote if you need some help.

Decision-making under adversity - AusIMM Bulletin

Featured in October 2016 in the Australian International Mine Management Bulletin.

Decision-making Under Adversity - By Amanda Blesing and Russell Boon

Learning how the brain interprets and processes stressful situations can help the decision-making process in high-pressure environments

We initially became interested in decision-making as a topic because of insights and evidence from the gender diversity debate. Organisations with both women and men on the leadership team in relatively equal numbers perform better on a range of measures including profitability, productivity, risk, customer satisfaction and staff engagement. And the reasons why? Researchers put it down to better decision-making:

  • ‘companies with strong female leadership deliver a 36 per cent higher return on equity, according to the index provider MSCI’ (World Economic Forum, 2015)
  • ‘companies ranked in the bottom quarter in terms of gender diversity on their boards were hit by 24 per cent more governance-related controversies than average’ (World Economic Forum, 2015).

However, women are frequently criticised for their decision-making. They’re allegedly slower at making decisions, wanting more evidence and are more risk averse. This is seen as a negative by organisations that are used to more masculine models of leadership.

Complexity vs Uncertainty

Complexity vs Uncertainty

On the flipside, we know that testosterone drives a bias toward action, competitiveness and risk taking, so men tend to make decisions faster. However, a too-fast decision isn’t always a better decision, and certainly a too-slow decision doesn’t get anyone anywhere fast. Additionally, when stress, anxiety or fear is added into the mix, no one is great at making decisions. In fact, we’re wired to bypass the logical parts of our brain when under pressure, which makes great decision-making really challenging.

 

READ MORE >>>

Five minutes with Amanda Blesing - C-suite mentor for women

By Emma Gardiner on International Women's Day March 8, 2016 in Supplier News, Spice Magazine (events & tourism)
 

Amanda Blesing, creator of The Ambition Revolution, shares her tips on how to step up, speak out and take charge.

“My mission in life is to help women to play a much bigger game – change the world if you will – and do so with big ideas, big vision and big, audacious bucket loads of confidence,” said Blesing.

The former CEO currently works with, and speaks to, busy and ambitious professional women to help keep them focused on their strategic goals around their leadership aspirations.

One of the things she said she noticed while working alongside those in professional roles and larger organisations was that the women tended to require a different style of encouragement in order to step up into leadership roles or opportunities.

READ MORE >>>

Sheryl Sandberg, Lean In 2.0 and Corporate Gender Bias - Entrepreneur

Every now and then I find a great article that takes a sightly different perspective or slant on solving an old problem. Gender equality is an old problem. I like the more masculine appraoch that this author takes to tackling biases.

Jonathan Segal, Contributor, Entrepreneur and Partner in Employment Practice Group of Duane Morris

OCTOBER 25, 2016 on Entrepreneur Magazine.

Research finds we are still 100 years away from gender equality in the C-suite. That's unacceptable.

It is now more than three years since Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, wrote her ground-breaking book, Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. “Lean In,” I believe, is shorthand for “Go for it, if you want it.”

In her book, Sandberg acknowledges that there are many systemic obstacles to the advancement of women in corporate America. However, her focus is what women can do to maximize their chance of success in spite of these obstacles.

Well, more and more women are leaning in. That includes applying for leadership positions and/or negotiating for more equitable compensation.

READ MORE >>>

As Women Take Over a Male-Dominated Field, the Pay Drops

The New York Times

Economic View, 18 March 2016
By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Excerpt below

"A new study from researchers at Cornell University found that the difference between the occupations and industries in which men and women work has recently become the single largest cause of the gender pay gap, accounting for more than half of it. In fact, another study shows, when women enter fields in greater numbers, pay declines — for the very same jobs that more men were doing before."

 

READ MORE ...

 

The Power of Flexibility: A Key Enabler to Boost Gender Parity and Employee Engagement - Bain & Co

February 04, 2016 Bain Brief

By Melanie Sanders, Jennifer Zeng, Meredith Hellicar and Kathryn Fagg

Excerpt and link below

" The way we work today is fundamentally different than how we worked a decade ago. Gone are the days when employees would work 9 to 5, Monday to Friday, and only within the four walls of the office. Thanks to leaps in technology, businesses now run 24/7 from anywhere and everywhere.

Flexible workplaces are becoming the norm. Employees are increasingly seeking flexibility in when, where and how they work. This growing demand is rooted in shifts in workforce demographics, accompanied by changing expectations of work-life integration. For example, the percentage of dual-income households in Australia has increased from 40% in 1983 to nearly 60% in 2013.1 We have seen the percentage of working mothers with children under the age of 18 increase by 6% in the past decade.2 The aging population means employees are staying in the workplace longer, often in a more flexible capacity. And the current generation of new recruits, known as millennials, has very different work expectations than their baby boomer parents. Survey after survey has shown what millennials want most is to work flexibly.3

For women, workplace flexibility is especially important.  ....."

 

READ MORE >>>

Three Major Shifts in Thinking that will help you Tackle Big Entrepreneurial Goals More Easily!

Article published by European Women In Business - October 2015

As women we are living and working in exciting times.  Right now, there is a huge spotlight on gender diversity and encouraging women into senior roles, into industries that have been the purview of men traditionally and even into the entrepreneurial space.  

However it would appear that women don’t need much encouragement when it comes to wanting to set something up for themselves.  In both Australia and the USA increasing numbers of women are setting up small businesses. Sometimes this is in addition to their paid employment and sometimes it’s in place of their regular salaried employment. 

Either way, women are beginning to carve out their own piece of the pie and quite clearly want a say in how their financial and personal freedoms turn out, that is not quite as reliant on other people’s good luck or poor planning. 

READ MORE ....