gender equity

What do you stand for? Connected women at the NAB

Thanks to a couple of women at NAB for sharing great content and inspiration via linkedIn using my special formula. Love your work Genevieve and Johanna! 

Be sure to get involved in the conversation on LinkedIn. 

I loved speaking in front of an audience who really get involved.

Well done to the organising committee! And well done to those who implemented learning immediately.

The communication habits that can undermine women's power - DAILY LIFE

Thanks to Karina Lane - Daily Life, SMH & The Age for interviewing me.

NOVEMBER 12 2017

Article by Karina Lane

Article by Karina Lane

I'm pretty passionate about helping women into the C-suite, and sometimes it's our language and mannerisms that can get in the way. Firstly because they are different to those of the incumbent at times which can contribute to "exclusion" and secondly, because they've not been a problem before if you worked in mostly feminised industries or in lower level roles, so you may not know that there is any difference or what is going wrong.

Being able to sharpen all the tools in your leadership toolkit is awesome.  Language and communication habits fit in this toolkit. Sometimes it's as simple as one small change to a verbal habit and it can make ll the difference.

As someone heading into the C-suite, self awareness and personal development will be part and parcel of your journey. There are times when you need to acknowledge that another way might be more helpful.  

Thanks to Karina for interviewing me for her article in Daily Life.

 

"I spent years working on my confidence, and knew the ins and outs of assertive communication. I was all about girl power. Apologise for taking up space? Not this lady.
But then I read Tara Mohr's book Playing Big: Practical Wisdom for Women Who Want to Speak Up, Create and Lead. Mohr argues that women constantly diminish their power with speech habits that make us appear apologetic, surprised or even uncertain about what we're saying. This means our ideas and opinions are unappreciated and not valued."
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The Great Debate: It’s not about the money, money, money…

From the Broad Agenda Blog and published on 30 June 2017

Written By: Megan Deas

COMMENTARY:  Actually, it was all about the money at the AIM Great Debate Canberra on 23June 2017 when six strong, intelligent and passionate women from various backgrounds got together to debate whether equal pay will close the gender gap.

With great wit and light-hearted banter, the panellists kept the audience entertained while providing evidence for both sides of the pay gap argument. A friendly and fun debate, the sense of camaraderie was evident on the podium, with zingy one-liners as the only daggers fired.

We here at BroadAgenda naturally love us a good debate, and were more than happy to cheer our Chief Editor Virginia Haussegger AM on as she joined forces with the negative team. Here’s our recap of the day.

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SMH 2015 - Annabel Crabb: I'm proud to be a feminist despite my regular lapses

From time to time I find articles that express the sentiments in my community, or that answer some of the questions my readers are asking. Here are the links to the source.

Thanks to Sydney Morning Herald, MARCH 7 2015 and Annabel Crabb for this gem.

 

I'm Proud to be a Feminist Despite my Regular Lapses

"Feminism is messy and imperfect, and has people you love, as well as people you can't stand.

I am a feminist because to be one seems perfectly obvious and reasonable to me. I am a feminist because it bothers me that women are more than 50 per cent of the population and more than 60 per cent of university graduates but somehow only 3 per cent of chief executives. I am a feminist because it bothers me that a woman gets killed by her male partner every single week, and somehow that doesn't qualify as a tools-down national crisis even though if a man got killed by a shark every week we'd probably arrange to have the ocean drained. I am a feminist because it bugs me that "working mum" is a phrase I hear every day but I never hear "working dad"."

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What’s really holding women back when it comes to money

As I prepare for the AIM Great Debate in Canberra on closing the gender salary gap on 23 June 2017 I've been looking at the economics of gender.  Our team is researching and exploring the data and arguments for both sides of the coin - Whether closing the gender salary gap will close the gender gap itself. I'm on the negative.

There is so much to explore including -

  • The data around the gender salary gap,
  • Bias, gender stereotypes and negotiating,
  • Is the gender gap all about money?
  • Where else might women be penalised purely as a result of gender including the tax on being female (products for women that are more expensive and GST on feminine hygiene products)
  • Domestic violence,
  • Career choices,
  • Career breaks,
  • What happens industries or sectors become feminised,
  • Representation of women in positions of power including public, NFP and
  • And the superannuation gender salary gap - the legacy that takes years to emerge.
Money, power and freedom by Dr Richard Denniss

The link below contains excellent information from a speech that the Dr Richard Denniss, Chief Economist at The Australia Institute, gave for the Breakthrough 2016 event on what’s really holding women back when it comes to money.  

Thanks to The Victorian Trust for their article The Three Big Lies Holding Women Back.

"Denniss’ keynote address breaks down the untruths we’re sold about women’s economic security. In short—the time for research and data collection is over—we need action!"

 

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(You won't be disappointed.)